HUNTING

Young’s Wilderness Camp offers a rich, mixed bag for the hunter. We are located on the Canadian Shield, also known as the Laurentian Plateau, an area where, during the Pleistocene epoch, continental ice sheets carved out deep valleys leaving behind myriad lakes, rivers and a dense boreal forest.

The more than a million acres of Crown Land is heavily populated with the deciduous plant life that provides a natural habitat for white-tail deer, black bear, moose and countless other mammals.

At Young’s Wilderness Camp maximizing your potential for success is our primary goal. You may bring your own boat or let us provide one for you. We offer 16-foot aluminum, deep V-hull boats with 25 hp outboard motors. All boats come with camouflage netting. We also have a limited number of canoes.

We adjust our meal schedule to fit your hunting preferences. Due to the proximity of hunting sites many of our hunters go out early for first light hunting, come back for breakfast, and then go back out again.

WATERFOWL HUNTING

There are four major North American waterfowl flyways and the eastern shoreline of Lake of the Woods is located in the heart of the longest migration route of any flyway in the Western hemisphere. The Mississippi flyway’s Northern terminus is the arctic coast of Alaska and its Southern-most point ends in Patagonia.

Stevens Bay is composed of countless small back bays and ponds sufficiently shallow to provide a perfect environment for habitat. The area yields the greatest concentration of wild rice anywhere in Northwest Ontario making it the ideal stop-over feeding point for migrating ducks.

Stevens Bay supports Black Ducks, Blue Wing Teal, Bluebills, Buffleheads, Gadwall, Goldeneyes, Green Wing Teal, Mallards, Pintails, Ringbills, Widgeons and Wood Ducks. There are also Greater Canada, Lesser Canada and Snow Geese.

It is the breath-taking beauty of the islands and mainland that also make it an ideal hunting destination. They are heavily wooded and feature significant habitat so hunters don’t need artificial duck blinds. Just lay out a spread of decoys and step back into the cover. Best of all, there are numerous land-mass points that provide excellent pass shooting without decoys. While we have guides available, there are over a dozen prime hunting blinds within five minutes of the camp. We’d be happy to take you around and show them to you.

The annual duck hunting season begins on the second Saturday of September and we accept guests through the second week of October. To keep hunting pressure down and increase success rate we only take a limited number of duck hunters at a time so it’s a good idea to make your reservation as early as possible.

We are far enough North that the early winter weather conducive to duck migration is common for the time of year however weather can be variable ranging from freezing cold with snow to shirt-sleeve warm. It is important to bring layered clothing to be prepared for any eventuality.

Duck hunting success is always subject to weather conditions so we suggest hunters consider making their stay at Young’s Camp a well-rounded hunting/fishing combination. There are miles of logging trails you can walk for some of the best grouse hunting you’ll ever experience and Ontario is famous for its muskie and Walleye fishing.

WHITE TAIL DEER HUNTING

The area supports one of the largest white-tail populations in North America. Field dressed bucks weighing in at 200 to 300 pounds with 20 point racks are not uncommon for the area.

What makes Young’s Wilderness Camp unique is it’s the only hunting camp on either Steven’s Bay or neighboring Stony Portage Bay. There is no public access to either other than a 22 mile boat ride from Nestor Falls. As a result, population is scarce, industrial development non-existent and hunting pressure very low.

We offer semi-guided hunts that include tree stands, blinds, overlooking positions of advantage, stalking and driving islands. Due to the significantly different terrain in the area shots can vary from 25 to over 400 yards. We will take you to prime areas to hunt and help you get situated then take out your animal by all-terrain-vehicle. Caping, dressing and processing are available on request and there is a freezer in camp.

It is important to understand these are not fenced hunts for animals raised in captivity. These are true fair chase hunts in terrain varying from wooded to rocky to marsh. Therefore, we recommend that you be in reasonably good physical condition. There is no more rewarding hunting experience than harvesting a fair chase buck in the Canadian wilderness. When you return home with a harvested buck you also have a story of a lifetime. It is also the ideal family hunting trip. At Young’s Wilderness Camp we subscribe to the belief, “Take your kids hunting or go hunting for your kids.”

Depending upon the exact dates, white-tail hunters may use rifle, shotgun, black powder or bow. For two weeks, starting the second week of September, white-tail deer may be taken by bow. Archery, rifle, shotgun and black powder may be used beginning the first Saturday of October until November. Check annual hunting regulations for specific dates.

REQUIREMENTS FOR HUNTERS

Hunting License
Non-residents of Ontario must present one of the following to obtain a current non-resident license to hunt in Ontario:

  1. An Ontario non-resident’s hunting license issued to you after January 1, 1968.
  2. A hunting license issued to you by a competent authority in any jurisdiction as a resident of that jurisdiction after January 1, 1968.
  1. An Ontario Hunter Education Examination Report or Certificate issued to you after January 1, 1968.
  2. An Ontario Hunting License Verification Certificate showing that you were issued an Ontario license to hunt, or passed the Hunting License Examination.
  3. A certificate, issued to you after January 1, 1968, by a competent authority in any jurisdiction, giving you permission to purchase a resident’s hunting license in that jurisdiction.

Youth Hunters
In Ontario the minimum hunting age for non-residents is 16. Children ages 16 – 18 years must be under the immediate supervision of a hunting adult. Be sure to check with Canadian immigration in advance of your trip to comply with the requirements for bringing a minor into Canada.

Firearms
Canadian customs allows hunters to bring rifles and shotguns, and up to 200 rounds of ammunition into Canada; handguns are not allowed. All firearms must be registered with Canadian customs when crossing the border and there is a Canadian $30 fee.

For waterfowl we recommend a 12 gauge shotgun with non-toxic #4 or larger shot and for upland game #8 or larger shot lead or non-toxic. For deer hunting with a rifle any plains game cartridge such as the .30-06 and .30-30 are appropriate.

Camouflage verses Blaze Orange
In Ontario waterfowl hunters may wear camouflage but upland and big game hunters are required to wear a hunter orange garment and head cover at all times. The hunter orange garment must cover a minimum of 400 sq. in. above the waist and be visible from all sides.

Hunting Dogs
To bring a dog into Canada you must have a certificate, signed by a veterinarian licensed in Canada or in the United States, stating that the dog has been vaccinated against rabies during the preceding 36 months. Also, Canadian law does not permit bringing dog food into Canada; it must be purchased locally.


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